Mary Lucia

Mary Lucia has earned a large fan base with her work as a broadcast personality, writer, actor and voice-over talent. Lucia began her media career doing evenings at REV 105, co-hosted mornings on Zone 105, and hosted a talk show, Somethin' Stupid, on 1500 KSTP.

From 1998 to 2001, she hosted the local music show Popular Creeps, a two-time Minnesota Music Award winner for "Best Locally Produced Show." For her work at The Current, Lucia has been voted best FM radio personality by City Pages seven times. In addition to her radio career, she has also appeared in commercials and in live theater productions.

Lucia likes cats and dogs more than people, wearing dead people's clothes and taking long walks off of short piers.

Stories by Mary Lucia

Mary Lucia: 'The Sad and Beautiful World of Sparklehorse'

After watching the documentary, 'The Sad and Beautiful World of Sparklehorse,' Mary Lucia found herself thinking about artists who feel defeated by a lack of commercial success yet are worshipped by peers for that very thing. 'What is that all about?' Mary writes, 'Their music is too peculiar? Too good? Too challenging?' Read more about Mary's thoughts about the new Sparklehorse documentary and about the life and career of its mainstay, Mark Linkous.

Mary Lucia: Iggy Pop and The Stooges get rock-doc treatment in 'Gimme Danger'

Having recently seen Jim Jarmusch's rock-doc 'Gimme Danger,' Mary Lucia shares her thoughts about the film. 'Gimme Danger's primary goal is to explore the influence of the Stooges' three classic albums,' Mary writes. 'This documentary is about the Stooges, and not exclusively Iggy Pop.' But there's plenty of Iggy-related stuff for fans, plus interviews to keep the band's legacy in the present. Read Mary Lucia's complete review.

Mary Lucia: an intimate and emotional portrait of Nick Cave

In July of 2015, before Nick Cave and his band recorded their latest album, 'Skeleton Tree,' Cave's 15-year-old son, Arthur, died falling off a cliff in Brighton. Rather than being asked the same wrenching questions over and over, Cave enlisted the help of a friend and collaborator to attempt to form an honest reflection of grief and improvisation; that is exactly what Andrew Dominik did. Read Mary Lucia's thoughts on the resulting film, 'One More Time With Feeling.'